Q&A #18: Josh Olds

 

 

Josh shares his journey as a reader, one way he makes use of Evernote, and his approach to find homes for a number of books after he got married.

 

Leigh Lim: Hi Josh, thanks for taking the time to do a Q&A! Looking through your reviews, I noticed that your reading focuses on different areas. Do you go off recommendations now?

Josh Olds: Leigh, I’m honored (and frankly surprised!) at the opportunity. I do tend to read in many different genres. It’s a luxury of being a somewhat professional book reviewer. I’ll always pick a good story outside my favorite genres than a mediocre story that’s within my “normal” parameters. As my review site, LifeIsStory.com has grown, so have my reviewing opportunities.

About half the books I read come from publishers or publicists who believe the book is a good fit for Life is Story. Usually, they’re right. The other half comes from doing a thorough search of publisher catalogs and seeing what interests me. A good book cover and tagline definitely makes a book stand out. I’m not likely to pick up a fiction book by an author I don’t recognize unless the cover and tagline catch my attention.

 

LL: Would you recommend a reviewer reach out directly to publishers?

 

JO: It depends on the size of your readership. I recommend that you start with book review programs such as BookLook Bloggers from Thomas Nelson or the Tyndale Blog Network or NetGalleys. All of these programs allow you to get your foot in the door and, once you have a history of quality reviews, you can seek out the publisher directly. That’s exactly how I’ve grown Life is Story over the years.

 

LL: How have your reading preferences changed through the years?

 

JO: I’ve definitely widened my reading range. 2014 was the year that I challenged myself to read books that I would normally decline. I also read a lot more what I would call “pastor” books. As a pastor (and writer), not only do I learn from the books but I’m learning how to structure my own writing.

 

 

LL: Writers that you loved from first read, until now?

JO: I can already tell that I’m going to be talking about Ted Dekker a lot. Ted has had a profound influence on my life (more on that later) and, yes, my reviews of his books do tend to emulate his style. Fun fact you may want to follow up on: I emulate his style so well that in 2011 I was asked to co-write a special promotional book he gave out to a select number of fans.

 

LL: Do you make it a point to catch live readings regularly? (or would you rather listen to the audiobook version?)

JO: I listen to audiobooks on occasion, but not often. I can read faster than I can listen.

 

LL: Do you usually re-read books?

JO: No. If I re-read a book, it’s a sure sign that I love it. My annual re-reads are When Heaven Weeps and The Circle Trilogy by Ted Dekker.

This is going to the top of the reading pile #wonder #booksofmarvella #travisthrasher

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

 

LL: How do you decide which books to keep after reading them?

JO: This is a difficult one. Just ask my wife! We literally have piles of books around the apartment and I’ve a couple thousand more volumes in storage at my parents’ house. I’m a book hoarder. If I love a book, I don’t want to part with it. If I don’t love a book, I don’t want to give it to someone else.

For our wedding, my wife and I took the duplicates of our merged libraries (close to two hundred duplicates!) and gave them away as wedding favors.

 

LL: Did you allow your guests select a wedding favor instead of a wedding gift?

JO: It wasn’t an either/or thing. Obviously, we weren’t going to demand gifts from our guests, but we are very thankful for everything we received. My wife and I owned a lot of books, but I had just come out of college and she is in college, so you know what we didn’t have? A toaster. The books were our way of saying “Thank You” for providing us with the things we deemed less important than books.

 

LL: Have you travelled to a specific area just to get a copy of a hard-to-find book?

JO: The first book signing that I ever attended was a huge event put on by Ted Dekker in 2009. Through his web forums, I’d become friends with a lot of fellow readers and the event marked the first time we ever met in person. Ted tends to have a book signing once a year, so I try to make it a point to go to a signing every year.

This is what happens when a fuzzy yarn ball falls apart.

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

 

LL: What’s your rule when purchasing new books?

JO: I’m lucky enough that 99% of the books I want to read are ones that publishers are willing to send me in exchange for a review. Buying a book means I really loved it. I allow myself one book a month to buy, generally an older title that I couldn’t get elsewhere or an academic title.

I’m all for the print version. An ebook copy is better only if the price is significantly lower or, as is the case in academic titles, is a book I’ll use more for reference and can easily search.

 

LL: Do you still gravitate towards physical copies of books?

JO: I thought I’d never read ebooks. I was wrong. But nothing can replace the feel of a physical book in your hand.

 

LL: For the eBooks you have, do you use a specific eReader?

JO: I use an iPad. The Kindle app is my friend.

I think the mailman helped me in the "lack of reading materials" department today.

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Do you find yourself wanting to get more material after reading a book?

JO: If it’s a book I love, always. I’ve had the privilege of interviewing many authors (from David Baldacci to Jerry Jenkins) because of this. Listening to an interview is great. Actually getting to pick up the phone and call them is even better.

 

LL: Any memorable answers?

JO: Usually I delete the raw audio recording after I’ve edited and published a podcast. Last year, post-interview but still on the recording, Max Lucado praised my writing and the website. To a pastor and book geek like me, that was probably the highest honor I’ve ever been given. I didn’t delete that audio.

Another good answer was when I had the opportunity to interview NYT bestseller Terri Blackstock. I don’t recall the exact reason why—construction on her neighbor’s house, I believe—but at the end of the call, she mentioned that she’d been sitting in her kitchen pantry with the door closed to best minimize the outside noise. It was a great interview and without any background noise. I appreciate Terri’s willingness to go above and beyond to give a good interview.

 

LL: Have you watched a film before reading the book?

JO: Confession: I have watched all the Harry Potter movies and read…none…of the books. They’re on my to-read list, you know, for when I run out of books to review.

Very rarely do I ever finish a book and think it should be made into a movie. Unless, that is, the books are very visual and action-oriented. Usually, the fear that a movie would mess up my favorite books outweighs wanting to see my favorite stories in a different medium.

LL: How many books do you bring when you are out and about?

JO: I once took a vacation to Florida and packed an entire suitcase worth of books. If I’m on a road trip and not driving, I’ll pack a book or two to pass the time. If I’m flying, then space is usually a concern, which is another perk to ebooks. But, I mean, usually four or five.

I never leave the house without a book. You never know when you might need to read.

 

LL: After reading a book, are they usually devoid of marks?

JO: I cannot stand highlighting or writing in a book. If I want to make a note (or capture a quote), I’ll generally use Evernote to make my notations.

 

 

LL: What’s the best (book related) gift you’ve received?

JO: Christmas 2004. The Circle Trilogy by Ted Dekker. It revitalized my interest in fiction and jumpstarted my own desire to write.

It was through this that I eventually made friends all over the country with people I consider my best friends. One of those friends is now my wife. You can call it a slippery slope argument, but I call it a very, very good gift.

Fun times with @kylermartyn at #CotM #ChristmasTrain

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: There are people who think that reading is quite a solitary activity, and forget that it is after a book is read that connection with other readers (in forums or during live readings) kicks in. What would your advice be to form and cultivate deep friendships like you did?

JO: If you find a good book, talk about it. Seek out others talking about it. Chances are if you both like the same literature, you have other things in common as well. A friendship built on books is a strong friendship indeed.

 

LL: The last book you were really excited about?

JO: Checkmate by Steven James. Steven’s been writing a superb thriller series for a past seven years and Checkmate concluded it.

 

LL: Favourite place to read?

JO: Nothing beats curling up in bed and spending a few hours with a good book.

Went to an amazing small bookshop today. Basically the whole place looks like this.

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Do you think there is a uniting quality from all the books you’ve read and enjoyed that draws you in?

JO: In terms of fiction, I look for a good story with a good theme. I abhor books that beat you over the head with their message. I don’t find any enjoyment or purpose in books that have no message. The best books are those [that] use the power of story to make you think.

 

LL: Are you a fan of boxed sets?

JO: Depends. I personally tend not to get boxed sets because I’ve usually followed the series through its individual releases. There’s something satisfying about seeing a boxed set, though. It’s like a nice way of partitioning a series and setting it apart from the rest of the bookshelf.

 

LL: Are there any misconceptions about you that you’ve had to clarify?

JO: After reviewing a book by NYT bestseller Eric Wilson, I got an email from him asking “This could be a weird question, but are you the Josh Olds from Family Force 5?” Turns out I share a name with the bassist of a Christian band. I’ve fielded that one a number of times.

Sometimes my job is weird

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Are there questions you find yourself answering multiple times?

JO: Everyone comes to me for Ted Dekker questions. Most people come to me for reading recommendations. I always tell them to check the website, it retains the information better than me!

 

LL: Are there times when you struggle to find time to read?

JO: Always. I work two jobs outside of Life is Story and have to carefully schedule and protect my reading time. Especially as the site has grown and I’ve had to do more administrative and publicity work, it’s gotten harder. Fortunately, I’m a fairly fast reader and can usually average two books a week.

 

LL: Were there instances when you hesitated about posting a review?

JO: Any negative review goes to my wife first. I want to make sure I’m tactful and offering constructive criticism rather than just tearing something down. I always sit on a negative review for at least a day and come back to it later. If my feelings about it stick, then that’s what I publish.

There have been a few instances where, for independent publishers, I’ve elected not to publically review a book but send back private feedback. For indie publishers, a review is the same thing as publicity and if I can’t help them publicly, I’ll do so privately.

@kylermartyn's present to me was six date nights to be used throughout the year. #bestwifeever

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Are you currently in the process of getting someone into reading?

JO: My brother. He’s a senior in high school and we couldn’t be less alike. Last year for Christmas I gave him a Kindle and preloaded it with some books I thought he’d like. He just finished the first one.

 

LL: Are there certain things you ‘geek out’ about?

JO: The Art of Story. Ted Dekker. Doctor Who. Jesus. My wife. Not necessarily in that order.

 

LL: Is there a topic that would get you talking endlessly?

JO: It changes weekly. This week I’m preaching on living in light of eternity, so right now I’m struggling with not preaching the whole sermon to you.

Best year of life so far. #firstanniversary

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Are you a big listener of music?

JO: Confession time. I’m not huge into music. I appreciate it. I enjoy it. I don’t follow it enough to know who sings what. As far as worship music, The Stand and This I Believe by Hillsong United are my favorites at the moment.

 

LL: What are you reading at the moment?

JO: Fiction: Then Sings my Soul by Amy Sorrells, Non-Fiction: Overrated by Eugene Cho, Websites: A daily read of mine is Cracked.com. Improvement: My friend Kevin Kaiser is putting up great content about making a living as an artist at his website 1ktruefuns.com. Bible: In the middle of an in-depth study of Ephesians.

 

LL: Do you go out of your way to discover new things? JO: I always check the publisher’s upcoming catalogs. They usually list books 3-6 months before they release. A couple months before release, I’ll put in my request.

LL: In what way do you approach motivation and inspiration?

JO: Well, as I define it, inspiration comes from the outside. Motivation comes from the inside. Both are necessary to succeed. As far as the writing life goes, I’d take motivation over inspiration any day.

 

LL: What makes you smile?

JO: My wife. It’s cheesy, but it’s true. She’s the funniest person I know.

 

LL: What’s your view about social media?

JO: I use it more for business than personal. I might post a personal update once every few days on Facebook, but all other social media is for Life is Story. I’ve taken a liking to Instagram as of late.

@kylermartyn and I have a long a storied friendship. #timehop

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Do you currently post at forums?

JO: I used to. The whole group of friends I had hung out a lot on a forum we created. Forums have died down as other forms of social media have taken their place, so not so much any more.

 

LL: Are there websites that you like to visit just because you like the design?

JO: I looked at a lot of different modern designs when researching the recent theme change at Life is Story, but other than that, no.

 

LL: What would you do when you need cheering up? (a particular website, listen to an album….?)

JO: Some time alone with God. Then commiserating with my wife.

Quick! What day is it??? #NationalPuzzleDay #lisdailycomic

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: Are you interested in technology?

JO: Technology interests me, but I’m definitely not a whiz kid with it.

 

LL: For someone reading one of your reviews for the first time, what is the message you’re hoping they’ll take with them?

JO: Overall, I want it to be “This guy knows what he’s talking about.” Life is Story can help people craft their whole years’ worth of reading and we take pride in offering quality reviews.

 

LL: What makes your soul sing?

JO: Writing. I don’t do enough of it.

Just let all the stress go away…. #BubbleWrapAppreciationDay #lisdailycomic

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

 

LL: What do you find is the best way to connect with other readers?

JO: Facebook is wonderful. I belong to a number of groups dedicated to various fanbases or reading in general.

 

LL: What kind of opportunities are you looking forward to?

JO: Well, I’d never turn down an opportunity to collaborate with Ted, but I doubt that’s even on the radar for him—though you never know.

Opportunities? There are so many out there that are within my reach in 2015. For Life is Story in particular, I’m working on capitalizing on this great opportunity I have called Behind the Pages, which is a twice-weekly guest column that I’m hosting on LiS. I’m bringing in a whole host of experts to talk about the various aspects of publishing, writing, editing, and so on. I’m going to learn a lot and it’s going to help Life is Story grow.

 

LL: In what way do you enjoy helping others?

JO: My wife and I…and I say I loosely, my wife runs the thing…have an organization called Gathering Family (GatheringFamily.org) that fundraises for families going through international special-needs adoptions. In the past 9 months, we’ve raised over $12,000 and been involved in helping five families bring their children home from an ocean away. It’s an exhilarating experience.

 

* Josh Olds writes for ‘Life is Story’. You can learn more about him through his tweets or viewing his photos on Instagram.

#tbt on a Tuesday because that's how I roll.

A post shared by Josh Olds (@revolds) on

Source Material and Notes: The material posted is based on correspondence (December 2014 – January 2015) between Josh and Leigh. Content has been edited for length, and the final version has been reviewed and approved by the interviewee.

Leigh Lim is a musician based at Sydney. You can find a sample of her music here. To reach out to Leigh, you can do so via this form or a direct message through YouTube. (Curious to find out if she’s your kind of person? You can check out her tweets and personal entries.)

Notes:

  • If there are things that you’d like to know about Josh that has not been covered, please do leave a note (using the second form gives me the opportunity to share your request with the WNE community and also to give Josh the option of answering).
  • Corrections and additional information: Spot one?
  • Q&A Suggestions (individuals or groups) and feedback (specific or general) are always welcome. 🙂
  • If you share a quote from your favorite Q&A on Twitter, don’t forget to use the hashtag ‘#WNEQA’!
  • WNEQA is now on Facebook! 🙂
  • This post has been tagged so it could be considered for Long Reads.
  • To lock me in to be involved in your Q&A/FAQ for your page, contact me or fast track your request here

Interested in reading more?

  • Following each Q&A session I post a separate entry (The Quote Jar: Fourteen) that would be a companion piece to Michal’s Q&A.
  • How about checking out all the other Q&As?

Want to start a conversation unrelated to the Q&A? That’s okay too! Just use the first form below. 😀

 

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Q&A #12: Aaron Strout

 

Aaron shares his journey as a consumer of music, the importance of Spotify in his listening experience, and how he took awhile to fall in love with The Beatles’ White Album.”

 

Leigh Lim: Hi Aaron, thanks for taking the time to do a Q&A! Looking through the different categories on your blog, I noticed that there isn’t a separate category for music. Does that mean that music is so much a part of you, it would be rare not to talk about it?

 

Aaron Strout: Leigh – Music is a passion for me. But really only as a consumer. I am an avid listener of new music (thank you Spotify!), consumer of live music and I love to share what I’m learning with others. However, I haven’t ever translated that into writing about music. I reserve that for mostly professional areas like mobile/location-based marketing/social/digital.

 

LL: How has your music tastes changed through the years?

 

AS: The first albums I ever remember listening to (this is in the mid-70’s) are the Beatles, Cream, Paul Simon and Led Zeppelin. My dad was an appreciator of good music so I came into this world listening to some great bands.

As I moved into my teen years, I moved from Van Halen, The Doors and The Kinks into early Rap (Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Run DMC and the like). That morphed into bands like Bon Jovi, Rush and others early days of college. Like many others, I then went through phases of dance music (Nina Cherry, Rob Bass, Digital Underground), Grateful Dead and then alternative (Cure, Smiths, Sinead O’Connor and Living Color).

Grad school was hardcore grunge — Alice in Chains, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, Screaming Trees (plus Nine Inch Nails). Now I really like everything save pop country.

 

Sunset at 2013 ACL Festival  Photo: Aaron Strout

Sunset at 2013 ACL Festival
Photo: Aaron Strout

 

LL: Artists that you loved from first listen, until now?

AS: Beatles, Rush, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, Rage Against the Machine, Norah Jones, Pink Floyd, Doors, Billy Squier. Early Run DMC and Public Enemy. Pretty Hate Machine in particular by NIN.

 

LL: Are there certain albums (or tracks) you avoid listening to because of nostalgia?

AS: There aren’t really any but Prince’s Purple Rain was that way for a while. I’m over it.

 

LL: Do you make it a point to catch live music (as it is being played/recorded) regularly? (or do you prefer attending ticketed events — or go for archive convert providers like wolfgangsvault.com)

AS: Probably more of the first two. And to contradict a little of what I said earlier, we have a video show called Live from Stubbs. We are starting to push harder into music and actually did an interview and recorded four live songs with the band, Lord Huron.

 

 

LL: What’s are your most listened to tracks?

AS: I keep an ongoing list on Spotify at any given time. My current one is called “Run Boy Run.” Three songs on that list that are earworms for me are Gin Wigmore’s Black Sheep, Manchester Orchestra’s, Top Notch and Wolf Alice’s Moaning Lisa Smile. Red Hot Chili Peppers, Black Keys and White Stripes are go-to artists for me on any given occasion.

 

LL: Does having an online playlist help a lot?

AS: Yes. I live by my online playlists. I have two that I listen to regularly – one that is a go to called “House List” – this is what I run to. The other is my collection of what I am listening to. A mixture of recommendations from friends, things I’ve Shazam-ed and such. Run Boy Run

 

LL: Albums that took you awhile to fall in love with?

AS: Hmmm… The Beatle’s White Album comes to mind. It’s esoteric so it took a while to grasp. Now it’s one of my favorites.

 

LL: Have you travelled to a specific area just to catch a performance?

AS: Sort of on one — my wife and I planned a trip to Portugal to visit friends but we specifically timed it to coincide with the 500th anniversary of Lisbon. The band, Morphine, was playing. I had never seen them live. It was ironically one of their last performances before lead singer, Mark Sandman, died. The other which was in the U.S. was Rage Against the Machine. I travelled by myself to LA Coliseum to see them perform with Muse, Rise Against and Lauryn Hill. It was an epic show.

C3 marker (Austin City Limits Music Festival) Photo: Aaron Strout

C3 marker (Austin City Limits Music Festival)
Photo: Aaron Strout

 

 

 

LL: What’s your rule when purchasing new music?

AS: Because of Spotify and Pandora, I don’t actually buy much music now (I do subscribe to the premium version of Spotify). Once in a while if I want to support a particular local artist/friend OR in certain cases like Tool and AC/DC who don’t make their music available via Spotify, I will go in and buy entire albums off of iTunes.

 

LL: Are you also intentionally going for digital rather than physical copies?

AS: Yes. I really only do digital/streaming these days. It’s more because I travel so much and move around a lot when listening to music.

 

LL: Would you watch documentaries related to the music you listen to?

AS: Yes. Love the documentary called “It Might Get Loud” which is a movie about Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin, The Edge of U2 and Jack White. I also have a copy of Dave Grohl’s Sound City but haven’t watched it yet.

 

LL: Do you bring music while you are out and about?

AS: Yes. I have it on my iPhone. I also have the house wired but also have a mobile Bose speaker. Music is with me wherever I go.

 

LL: Do you try to avoid listening to music via headphones or earbuds — and as much as possible in a way that you can share it with others around you?

AS: It’s a mix. Plane and office time is strictly earbuds. At home, it’s all speakers!

 

LL: Did it take awhile for you to decide which ones to put at home? (speakers, amplifiers…etc)

AS: We moved into a house that was already wired. So no, I didn’t spend much time on speakers/amplifiers. But I do have an awesome mobile Bose speaker that my friend, Jason Keath, gave to me. I also use Sonos via my home stereo. That allows my kids and me to DJ off our phones when we are at home.

 

LL: A music purchase you regret you didn’t make?

AS: I wish I bought more original physical albums like Nirvana’s Nevermind and Alice in Chain’s Dirt. Beyond that, probably not.

 

LL: What’s the best (music related) gift you’ve received?

AS: My first CD player from my parents in 1989. It changed music for me forever.

 

LL: Memorable recommendations from ‘kids, neighbors and colleagues‘?

AS: My oldest daughter turned me onto Bad Suns. She also is exploring a lot of new music so she is keeping me current. Truth be told, I ask from time to time on Facebook for new music recommendations and that’s where I get a lot of my new music.

Those three songs I mentioned above are from my Facebook requests. My friend, Kyle Flaherty, and I share musical tastes so he turns me onto new stuff from time to time like the Bands Hozier and Broken Bells. To that end, I go to Austin City Limits Music Festival every year. That is also a big driver of new music for me.

 

LL: Do you still listen to radio?

AS: I do. I listen in the car about 50% of the time. I have a pop station, alternative, classic rock and modern rock station that I usually hit up. I actually Shazam those regularly to get new music choices (not so much the classic rock station).

 

 

LL: While you were writing your book, did you listen to specific albums? (or did you have a specific playlist going to keep you writing consistently — and to keep you in the ‘zone’ as much as possible?

AS: Mostly chill music. Stuff like Massive Attack, Norah Jones and the like. I definitely can’t listen to heavier stuff when I write.

 

LL: Do you prefer smaller venues (with as little amplification as possible) than stadium type ones? (for live performances)

AS: Yes. Not so much for the “as little amplification as possible” but more for the intimacy piece. I also find that that bigger stadiums tend to be more cookie cutter and harder for the crowd to get into the show.

The Black Keys* in Austin (2012) Photo: Aaron Strout * One Aaron's 5 favorite bands!

The Black Keys* in Austin (2012)
Photo: Aaron Strout
* One Aaron’s 5 favorite bands!

 

LL: Do you have a favourite live album?

AS: First would be U2’s Under a Blood Red Sky. Second is Nirvana’s Unplugged. AIC’s Unplugged is also awesome. Regarding Youtube, there is a version of Graffiti 6’s “Stare Into the Sun” that is acoustic and AWESOME!

 

LL: Is knowing the song’s lyrics important to you?

AS: Sometimes yes. If the song is meaningful to me. But I can get into the soul of a song even without knowing the lyrics.

 

LL: Aside from music, are there certain things you ‘geek out’ about?

AS: My kids, Boston Sports, Barbecue, photography… to name a few.

Aaron's daughters (oldest and youngest) in front of the “I Love You” wall in Austin. They both LOVE music and are an inspiration to Aaron. Photo: Aaron Strout

Aaron’s daughters (oldest and youngest) in front of the “I Love You” wall in Austin. They both LOVE music and are an inspiration to Aaron.
Photo: Aaron Strout

 

LL: Do you get drawn in by various other forms of art?

AS: Definitely photography. And usually it’s the reverse, I see visions of certain things/scenes when I am listening to certain songs. For Sarah McLachlan, there is a song called “Fear” on her Fumbling Toward Ecstasy Album. Every time I hear it all I can envision is a cool second floor room at sunset with the windows open and white sheers gently billowing. Not sure why but it is a very clear visual.

 

LL: Do you go out of your way to discover new things?

AS: Yes. Food, books, places to travel to.

 

LL: Where do you go for inspiration?

AS: I rely pretty heavily on my social channels. But often, going for a long drive or a long run can help me clear my head and give me perspective.

 

LL: What makes you smile?

AS: I love all three of my children to death but my seven year old daughter says things sometimes that I just can’t help but smile. The things she says come completely out of left field sometimes. My other go to is the line from Good Will Hunting where Will asks one of the Harvard Student’s if he likes apples. The student (on the other side of a restaurant window) shrugs and says “yeah?” Will says, “I got her number (Skyler), how d’ya like them apples?!?” Not sure why but I love that line.

 

LL: What’s your view about social media?

AS: Embraced it early on (2006) and have never looked back. Surprised actually when others don’t embrace it.

 

LL: What are your favourite sites at the moment?

AS: Medium is pretty cool from a blogging perspective. Otherwise, I bounce around a lot thanks to Facebook and Twitter.

 

LL: Are there websites that you like to visit just because you like the design?

AS: Medium – very clean.

 

LL: What would you do when you need cheering up?

AS: A little Jack White or Skrillex always get me going when I’m down.

 

LL: What has been the most memorable time a band connected to you?

AS: The day that Chris Cornell tweeted me was a major highlight. I’ve always been a huge Soundgarden fan.

 

LL: What makes your soul sing?

AS: Running. Spending a night out on the town with my wife. Austin City Limits Music Festival.

 

LL: What do you find is the best way to connect with your circle?

AS: Facebook for sure.

 

 

 

* Aaron Strout is based in Austin and the Managing Director of WCG. You can find more about his book here, his entries here, and Tweets here .

 

Source Material and Notes: The material posted is based on correspondence (October-November 2014) between Aaron and Leigh. Content has been edited for length, and the final version has been reviewed and approved by the interviewee.

Leigh Lim is Mini-Bio Photoa musician based at Sydney. You can find a sample of her music here. To reach out to Leigh, you can do so via this form or a direct message through YouTube. (Curious to find out if she’s your kind of person? You can check out her tweets and personal entries.)

Notes:

  • If there are things that you’d like to know about Aaron that I have not covered, please do leave a note (using the second form gives me the opportunity to share your request with the WNE community and also to give Andrew the option of answering).
  • Corrections and additional information: Spot one? Let me know!
  • Q&A Suggestions (individuals or groups) and feedback (specific or general) are always welcome. 🙂
  • If you share a quote from your favorite Q&A on Twitter, don’t forget to use the hashtag ‘#WNEQA’!
  • This post has been tagged so it could be considered for Long Reads. 🙂

Interested in reading more?

  • Following each Q&A session I post a separate entry (The Quote Jar: Eleven) that would be a companion piece to Aaron’s Q&A.
  • How about checking out all the other Q&As?

Want to start a conversation unrelated to the Q&A? That’s okay too! Just use the first form below. 😀

 

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